Tag Archives: James Joyce

LAURENCE STERNE Coxwold North Yorkshire

LAURENCE STERNE was born on November the 24th 1713 in Clonmel, County Tipperary, Ireland and died in London on March the 18th 1768, he was 52.

Thirsk Bank

He was the author of The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman which is widely considered the first postmodernist novel, well ahead of its times and a true forerunner to his fellow countryman James Joyce. He also was the author of A Sentimental Journey.

Rev Laurence Sterne

He was Vicar of the North Yorkshire village of Coxwold for eight years were he was laid to rest in 1969 when his body was exhumed when his London resting place St George’s, Hanover Square was sold for redevelopment.

“I am persuaded that every time a man smiles – but much more so when he laughs – it adds something to this fragment of life.”
Rev. Laurence Sterne

“But this is neither here nor there why do I mention it? Ask my pen, it governs me, I govern not it.”
Rev. Laurence Sterne

St Michael's Church


 

An Irish Original, A Castaway, Dorothy L Sayers and An Unexplained Coincidence.

March 27, 2012_Cambridgeshire-1300_001.jpg

My reading list has always had an eclectic feel, is subjected to whims of fancy and unexplained meanderings. Some would says it is undisciplined and chaotic, lacking structure although in my defence I do have a comprehensive reading list.

I have been spending sometime in the company of Leopold Bloom of Dublin of late, I have to be  frank and say it is an experience not without its difficulties. Now I have read The Dubliners and was entertained and pleasantly surprised but Ulysses, to be honest I have closed the covers (Switched Off The Kindle) for present at the end of Part Two with the intention of reacquainting myself at a later date when I can collect my thoughts and courage and rejoin Bloom and Stephen in Episode sixteen.

To try to find an antidote to post modernism I though being shipwrecked on a desert Island would be a perfect solution and therefore decided Robinson Crusoe would be ideal.

Now you would think after spending time in the company of Daniel Defoe I would be ready to return to The Great Northern Railway Station, but I found that The Life of D L Sayers was a more attractive proposition, so wandering of into The Fens, Bluntisham, Oxford, Christchurch Cambridgeshire and the world of Lord Peter Wimsey developed an appetite for detective fiction, so was inspired to take up The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins.

I do not know if you believe it is fate, Devine providence or pure coincidence but it did come as a comfort that I was not the only lost soul like Gabriel Betterridge who had sought comfort and inspiration in the company of Robinson Crusoe.

Today we love what to-morrow we hate,
Today we seek what to-morrow we shun,
Today we desire what to-morrow we fear.

Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe.